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6 Things Nobody Tells You About PostPartum

21 November 2016


Every single baby book talks to you in length about your baby, what to expect, what not to expect. All the apps tell you what your baby will look like from week to week, what's growing, how they're developing. But does anything really go into enough detail about what happens after birth? I thought I'd share some of my tips, after two babies, that I've learnt along the way.

1. Firstly, everyone wants to know everything. Particularly if you're a blogger, there is such a huge pressure to instantly tell the world the babys name, weight, and whether you're now sporting stitches down below, or stitches across your tummy. I'm almost certain half of the people asking are looking for a gory story. Sometimes, you don't want to. I didn't reveal P's name for a week, just because it was for us, and people were insatiable it was quite ridiculous, also what if the birth didn't go how you want. Leave people alone, give them time to come to terms with what the hell just happened, your noseyness can wait.

2. 2 weeks really isn't enough. Paternity leave is quite frankly a crock of shit, and quite frankly so out dated. There is no allowance for any other circumstances that might require Daddy to have some more time at home, John spent 9 days of his paternity leave up at the hospital, so we really only got 4 days at home together. Other ladies I know who have had c-sections, still shouldn't be lifting anything but have to manage as their other half has to go back to work. Two weeks sound like a long while, but they absolutely fly by.

3. You don't spring back. Cue a smug me at 3 weeks thinking I was fine and back to myself. Not so smug at 10 weeks when so much of my hair fell out, my baby didn't nap all day anymore and suddenly I didn't feel quite so me anymore. Everyone (myself included) talks about not being able to wait till 'I feel myself again', but I think it's unrealistic to think you'll ever be your pre-pregnancy you. And that's ok, you're a post-pregnancy Mum!

4. You'll probably cry, a lot. I think it's a thing (it's definitely a thing) for motherhood to turn you into a quibbly wreck. A child got a paper cut in Emmerdale, tears. You start to discuss your babies birth, tears. Your other half didn't put the dishes away, tears. Same applies for point 3, it's okay, it's completely normal, your marriage isn't ruined because you're arguing every week. You've got a tiny precious baby that is 50% yours, and 50% his, there is going to be a few 'disagreements'.

5. Sweat happens. So does wee. Night sweats were horrendous for me, particularly after P as it was the height of summer, waking up in a cold patch isn't glam, but it's real so you know, accept defeat, all that water has to go somewhere. You might also realise your urge to pee is rather more urgent, you just can't hold it the same, and sometimes you don't hold it all at all. That's alright, what are tena lady for after all?

6. Lastly, it will get better. I promise you that, and in my experience, it gets easier with each child. Plus, they're so bloody worth it.
My Petit Canard

9 comments:

  1. This is so true and its hard not to compare yourself to others who have pinged back or don't look like death warmed up. I had the worst water infection and so Poppy's first couple of weeks on special care were hard. We kept our annoucement quite quiet and SCBU was parents only which was quite nice. Thanks for joining us for #marvmondays

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  2. So true about paternity leave - I had an emergency c-section which I wasn't prepared for, and my husband going back to work after 2 weeks was the shock of my life! I was told not to lift anything heavy - well, my baby was over 10lbs at birth so I had no choice. #MarvMondays

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  3. These are so true. Especially the smugness, I was so convinced I had everything nailed; our baby slept loads, I felt great etc then realtiy hit at around three months with hair loss, depression about weight (why didn't it keep falling off?! breastfeeding's supposed to make you skinny... right!?), bone aching tiredness from being up half the night! People don't tell you how hard it is, well they do, but I didn't really appreciate quite how hard it'd be - am on a mission to change that for future though! Thanks for sharing #marvmondays

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  4. A great post and so true! Paternity leave I honestly think should be a minimum six weeks because it's a huge adjustment to family life, particularly if the baby is premature or if you've had a c-section. #MarvMondays

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  6. My god the night sweats. No one told me about them. And the crying at everything. But yes, you're right, it does get better - or maybe we just get used to it. #marvmondays

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  7. I think we just carve a new kind of 'normal' - nothing can be the same as before! #marvmondays

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  8. I think we just carve a new kind of 'normal' - nothing can be the same as before! #marvmondays

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  9. I have no children but I absolutely love reading your blog! I'm so in love with the content you create, I'm off to grab a cuppa then I plan on spending the next hour or so right here haha :) thanks for sharing! x
    www.elliswoolley.blogspot.com

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